New auction site as an alternative to eBay

In response to the tariff increases from eBay, the new European auction site DiverseTrade.com will start Monday. That is a day before eBay significantly increases the rates for web traders. DiverseTrade wants to attract traders online by offering them considerably lower rates and greater ease of use

In response to the tariff increases from eBay, the new European auction site DiverseTrade.com will start Monday. That is a day before eBay significantly increases the rates for web traders. DiverseTrade wants to attract traders online by offering them considerably lower rates and greater ease of use.

Initiator Maurice Valentijn of DiverseTrade started as a hobbyist at eBay. After eBay's discussion forum, the 'bulletin board', more and more negative messages about the auction site were removed by moderators, Valentine decided to set up a forum for themselves. That forum was named DiverseTrade.com and has been in existence since 26 July. Up to now, according to Valentine, about 22, 000 messages have been posted, and the site has had more than two million page views.

The success of the forum led to the idea to start an alternative for eBay. Not entirely coincidentally, the new site will start next Monday; a day later, on 22 August, eBay is increasing its price increases. Valentijn: "People can view our site on the 21st before they decide to switch on the 22nd."

DiverseTrade is similar in structure to eBay, according to Valentijn. The site therefore focuses, in contrast to, for example, Marktplaats.nl, on international online trade. In addition to lower rates, the auction site also offers other benefits, says Valentijn. The site offers an online helpdesk, and a live helpdesk in the near future.

At the moment, 12 people are working on the site, of which four are full-time. The IT company DiverseLab is the company behind the auction site.

DiverseTrade works with a fixed subscription form, where users can for example offer 500 articles for 15 euros. It is calculated that 3 cents per article. In the Netherlands it costs 1 cent to owners of an eBay Store to offer an item. Soon it will be 5 cents for articles up to 500 euros, and 20 cents for the placement of articles of 500 euros and more expensive. Unlike eBay, DiverseTrade does not charge commission costs afterwards.

The interest in the new auction site is very big according to the founders of the site. Both from the private and business market, they claim. How big the interest really is, the coming period will have to prove. Perhaps the dozens of Dutch eBay traders who discontinued their activities at the Dutch internet auction are among the first group of switchers. Emerce reported here a few weeks ago. Their departure from eBay was a protest against the rate increases.

Other eBay users protested by signing a petition; some 27, 000 eBay users worldwide have signed this so far. A total of 209 million internet users are registered as registered eBay users; 40 percent of this is 'active'.

Incidentally, not all eBay traders are sorry about the price increase. Especially larger traders welcome the change, because it would result in a split. Traders have long complained about the ever-increasing pollution of the trading platform.