Truck driver invents ideal holiday app: Dishlator

Dishlator "I now wanted to know exactly what was on my plate in the restaurant and what had tasted so good for me", explains Bijlsma. "On the gamble I ordered here and there from the menu, sometimes there were pleasant surprises. But I often had no idea what I had just eaten. That had to be over

Dishlator

"I now wanted to know exactly what was on my plate in the restaurant and what had tasted so good for me", explains Bijlsma. "On the gamble I ordered here and there from the menu, sometimes there were pleasant surprises. But I often had no idea what I had just eaten. That had to be over. "That's why Bijlsma came up with his own app on the way back home in the cab of the truck: Dishlator (http://www.dishlator.com/). The name is a combination of dish (dish, dish) and translator (translator).

What is the name of a dish

With Dishlator you can connect without Wifi or 3G to find out how a dish is called in Dutch and which ingredients are in it. The fact that the app works without an internet connection saves costs and a lot of hassle abroad. "Not every regional restaurant has translated menus or open Wi-Fi and data traffic abroad is going to cost a lot after a while. I want to prevent people on holiday from eating steak or escalope because there are so many treats to be discovered at international cuisines. "At first the application only has French, Italian and Spanish cuisine with a translation into Dutch only.

Database of dishes

The app consists of a database of 5500 dishes and ingredients that are stored on the app per language. The dishes come from renowned international cookbooks, such as Le Guide Culinair by Auguste Escoffier. Bijlsma: "But in principle I can add all languages ​​and bring the app to the store in all countries of the world. Every year 250 million tourists come to Europe and they all have to eat, so the market is big enough. "

Funded from your own pocket

Bijlsma is serious about the Dishlator app, which he financed entirely from his own pocket. The Hilversum trucker has international ambitions with the app and hopes to soon be able to release it in more countries and languages. The free app is provisionally available in the Netherlands and Belgium. The user pays 1.59 euros per dictionary.

Functionalities

- The crazy cook Silly Basil welcomes the smartphone user.

- Buy a dictionary in one or more languages ​​in the app.

- Search the dishes in the app by ticking them.

- The app already shows possible results.

- You can view the selection via the menu Dishes.

- Let the iPhone go around the table!

- Order what you like. Enjoy your meal!