Brits want to approach shared cookie privacy

The office of the British Information Commissioner's Office (ICO), together with the United States and Europe, wants to develop standards for cookie use. The American Do Not Track initiative must be aligned with European regulations. That's what Dave Evans told ZDNet. "There is no point in working out regulations in isolation, since this is the internet

The office of the British Information Commissioner's Office (ICO), together with the United States and Europe, wants to develop standards for cookie use. The American Do Not Track initiative must be aligned with European regulations. That's what Dave Evans told ZDNet. "There is no point in working out regulations in isolation, since this is the internet."

As part of the UK Privacy and Electronic Communications Regulations (PECR), a stricter regime for cookie use in the United States will apply from 26 May. The Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) will call fifty unspecified internet companies to see if they comply with the regulations. For the time being, a mild policy will be implemented. The ICO can only intervene if complaints come. Theoretically, fines of up to 500, 000 pounds are possible.

In the Netherlands, the Dutch Senate has recently adopted a new Telecommunications Act, which imposes stricter requirements on websites for the placing of cookies. The legislation will go into effect on 1 July, but there is still a lot of uncertainty about the law in the internet industry.

The Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB) in the Netherlands wants to wait and see what the European Union wants to do with the Do Not Track button for web browsers. The English proposal to standardize seems only to help in that respect.

Minister Verhagen has asked the regulator OPTA to maintain the rules that have been introduced only from 2013, until that time sites have to inform visitors.